How to Tell If Someone Is an Alcoholic

Perhaps you’ve noticed that your loved one is drinking a bit more often than they used to or drinking more when they do drink. Maybe you’ve seen changes in their personality or their health. Whatever the running list is, you may be asking yourself how to tell if someone is an alcoholic. The truth is that the only one who can determine if someone is an alcoholic is that person. However, you know when something has changed in your loved one’s behavior, and there may be enough signs to warrant a conversation. Here at  The Nook, we understand the difficulty in loving someone who is an alcoholic or addict. We are here to support you and your loved ones as they recover. 

Signs of Alcoholism

Alcoholism is a disease that encompasses more than drinking; it is a disease of mind, body, and spirit. As an outsider looking in, you may notice that your loved one is not happy without being able to have a drink or may need to drink earlier in the day to function. You may also notice that the drinking continues no matter the consequences. Is your loved one facing problems at home, at work, or even in the courts but continuing to drink? These are all ways to tell if someone is an alcoholic. Additionally, if you have tried to talk to them about their drinking and the response has been heated, they may have a problem. 

Beyond the emotional and personality signs, there will be physical signs as well. Are you noticing tremors or shaking hands in the mornings? Is your loved one complaining of not feeling well in the mornings? Are you finding liquor stashed in different spots throughout your home? Alcoholics who discover that they need the alcohol just to get through the day will find places to hide alcohol in an attempt to hide their drinking. Sometimes the first step for you is to observe what is happening objectively. Start a list so that you’ll be able to present the facts when it is time to talk. 

How to Get Someone Help With an Alcohol Addiction

One of the saddest things about addiction and alcoholism is that help usually only works when the person with the problem wants help. You cannot make someone want to get sober. However, you can talk to them about how their addiction or alcoholism affects you and your family. You can set clear boundaries about what behavior you will or will not accept. Finally, you can ask them to get help. If they are interested in getting help, there are many options. As you explore treatment options such as partial hospitalization or intensive outpatient, your loved one might explore peer support recovery groups as a first step. If you are unsure of what treatment facilities are in your area or how to choose one, you can reach out to your family physician for assistance in making decisions. 

How the Nook Helps With Addiction and Recovery

Early recovery often requires additional support, and sober living homes are a great way to get that support. Choosing a sober living facility can be difficult, and there are lots of options. Depending on your current circumstances, you may want a location close to those you know, or you may want to start over in a new place. Once you’ve selected a site, you’ll want to look for a sober house that will best support you. So, as you explore your options, be sure to look at the requirements for continuous sobriety and the house’s offerings.  

Sober living homes located in Los Angeles are located centrally to allow for outings to the beach, to the golf course, to the mountains, and to explore Los Angeles.  At The Nook, we focus on lifelong recovery. We offer our clients support to live a life that allows for the maintenance of employment, educational, and familial commitments. Contact us today to see how we can support your life in recovery.